20 new ways to think about vision in 2020.

Time is flying as we find ourselves at the end of January 2020.

As we entered the New Year, many of us had visions for what our year would look like. New Years is a wonderful time to reset, to re-evaluate, and set goals and intentions for the year ahead.

But it’s easy to let that renewed energy that we feel at the beginning of the year fade and sometimes wane altogether. And the goals we felt so committed to can start to be less important in our lives.

Holding to our vision in order to realize plans takes consistent re-evaluation adjustment, and renewed commitment.

When our goals are consciously aligned with our values, it makes them easier to stick to. Because they mean something to us, they are worth dedicating time to in our busy daily lives. They represent and can refocus us on what we believe is important.

Clarifying our values is the first step. Then we can determine how our plans and goals fit in so that, when we feel unmotivated, we can remind ourselves of the meaning behind what we do.

We wanted to take this opportunity to state the values of the Cambridge Institute for Better Vision and to give you some things to think about in terms of your eyesight and the broader meaning of your vision.

CIBV grew out of a desire for growth, for self-improvement, for empowerment. The idea that one can improve one’s own eyesight fits within the broader personal growth movement. Living a healthy lifestyle, bringing awareness to healthy and unhealthy patterns, striving to be ones’ best self so that we can make the world a better place.  This is the context within which our founder began his own journey of vision improvement.

But there is another key element at the heart of the Cambridge Institute’s work. And that is the belief that we are all (with the exception of a small few) born with the ability to see clearly. We are equipped with everything we need. But overtime we unlearn how to see clearly.

We believe that, in a big way, the process of Better Vision is about unveiling and restoring our innate ability to see. This has to do with giving our eyes and body the nutrients they need, releasing stress and tension, and retraining the eyes and brain to work well together. It also has to do with releasing emotions and changing beliefs about our eyesight. It involves changing our own relationship to seeing, in all its many iterations.

What could be a better time to think about eyesight and all the nuances of vision than the year 2020 (“perfect” vision).

Here are 20 new ways to think about your vision in 2020.

Do you appreciate what you can see?

Do you notice what you cannot see?

What are your blind spots?

Do you spend enough time exploring the blurry areas? Or do you dwell too much there?

What do you tell yourself about your eyes? Do you feel hopeless? Accept defeat? Have hope? Take action?

Are you “trying” too hard to see? Can you relax and let the images present themselves to you?

How is your attitude about your eyes similar to or different from your attitudes in other areas of your life?

How is the health of your eyes demonstrative of your overall health?

Do you use your mind’s eye?

Do you practice visualization?

Would you like to be able to visualize your future more clearly?

Would you like to be able to see other people more clearly?

Do you take the time to see your loved ones? To see your adversaries?

Do you allow yourself to be seen?

How do seeing and being seen relate for you?

What is it that you don’t want to see?

Do you walk around with your head down or do you look into other peoples’ eyes.

Are you open to new points of view? To seeing something from someone else’s vantage point, even if only for a moment?

Do you spend more time looking at the good or at the trouble?

How can you begin to see the world in new way this year?

We encourage you to dig in to these questions. To continue to expand and to deepen your understanding of vision as you move forward in 2020.

see more clearly, love more deeply

Valentine’s Day has come to be primarily associated with chocolates, flowers, teddy bears – all very sweet and fun – but very superficial expressions of love.

But this holiday can remind us to bring our awareness to something really important – how we are expressing love to ourselves and to others and in the world at large.

Long ago the eyes were called the windows to the soul.

Our eyes are sensitive, emotional receptors.

When you really want to get to know somebody you don’t look up their nose, you don’t look in their ears, you look in their eyes.

The eyes are an energy pathway out of the body. A window into someone’s inner being. A way for us to connect.

Yet we can go through an entire day and go to the store, go to work and go to a million different places, but maybe never, or maybe only once or twice, actually really look into another person’s eyes.

Why is this? Have our lives, like this holiday become more and more superficial? Are we afraid to see? Are we afraid others will see us?

As children we were naturally curious and we felt little shame.

Kids tend to start off very open, usually very loving, and caring. Most of us also started out with clear eyesight.

But along the way we develop patterns that keep us from seeing, and as a result keep us from connecting.

If a child sees something unfamiliar or alarming, say for example a man in a wheelchair, the little kid’s initial, immediate, unfiltered response is to be curious, “What is that? Why is that person in the chair?” The child might even want to go up and touch the chair or something like that. And what is often the parent’s first response? “Don’t look at him”.

In that pure child’s way there is a relationship between what we see, what we feel and what we do, but when we are in our process of socialization, we are taught to separate that out. We are taught to not look at certain things, we are taught to not look at people in a certain way, we are taught to be separate and, in the process of being taught to not see, we are taught to not feel, and to not act.

There is a connection between eyesight and personality, between eyesight and our relationship to ourselves, to others, to the world.

There is something we call a “myopic personality”, or “nearsighted personality”, which we will talk more about in another post. Certain traits of this personality that are exhibited by people who are nearsighted, are a contraction, a withdrawal from the outer world, a flight response without actually fleeing.

If you are nearsighted, or even if you are not, try examining whether there are ways in which you have constricted your world.

Do you really see the people you encounter as you go through life? Do you allow them to see you?

Tests have been done to show that if a person or an animal’s visual landscape is reduced for a period of time, for example marines who have spent time in submarines, they become more nearsighted. But the reverse is also true. When we retract into ourselves, bring our awareness in closer, we can create the conditions for ourself that lead to nearsightedness. This often happens on an unconscious level, so it is worth bringing attention to. 

What are you unwilling to see? Are you shutting down parts of your awareness or parts of your consciousness as an avoidance tactic?

And are there ways to face those areas of your life and engage?

Is it possible that we are not seeing or connecting because we know if we did we would feel something and inevitably be compelled to act on what we feel?

It is only when we have lost touch with our own ability to see and to connect that we lose touch with the power of the fullness of our feelings and our drive to action.

Or are we too afraid to look into someone else’s eyes because we don’t want them to see us? When we are truly seen we are exposed.

Yet showing your authentic self can lead to the most rewarding connections and deepest love. Can you bring more compassion to yourself?

An intimate relationship can be difficult if we have been patterned to disconnect, to shut down our feelings, and to hide.

Can you allow yourself to be seen?

Take on the challenge this month to make your expression of love a deeper one. Either reach out to someone you have isolated yourself from, or express yourself to someone you spend every day with in a more authentic way. Maybe there is someone at the checkout at the grocery store or at the gas station you frequent that you have encountered before but never taken the time to look in there eyes and see them. You could stretch by expressing an act of self-love and forgiving yourself or offering yourself some words of kindness . Maybe chose a certain limitation you have, a short-coming, a part of yourself that you have judged or not fully accepted. And spend some time with this part of yourself. Tell it you acknowledge it as part of you. These simple gestures can be incredibly powerful if done with pure intention.

At the Cambridge Institute for Better Vision our goal is to teach people how to release the negative patterns on the muscular level in the eyes, but also how to release the negative patterns on the emotional level, how nutrition affects the way you see, how your mind, your attitudes, your perception, your imagination, and your inner healing can be used to help you change and improve your eyesight.

Healing our vision and clearing the negative patterns that keep us from seeing brings forward the opportunity for us to feel compassion, to heal our hearts, and to love more deeply. It also allows us the opportunity to act out of whatever those open eyes and open heart call us to act upon.

EyeMax Plus

Contains a unique and balanced blend of 33 essential nutrients that are known to promote both eye and body health.

Learn More

The Program for Better Vision

Step-by-step, holistic approach that you can practice in just 20 minutes a day.

Learn More

product buttons

PBV  CLICK HERE to begin helping nearsightedness, astigmatism, eye imbalances, eye strain.

RWG  CLICK HERE to begin helping presbyopia (the need for reading glasses).

EMP  CLICK HERE to see the essential Vision Formula we recommend.

Contact

Better Vision
65 Eastern Ave #B1-E
Essex, MA 01929

Toll Free: 1-800-372-3937
International: 1-978-801-1850
Fax: 1-978-768-3938
Hours: 10am - 4pm EST
info@bettervision.com

Get started on your path to better vision today

with the Program for Better Vision.

SOME COMMON VISION CONDITIONS THAT WE CAN HELP WITH*:

There may be more than one product that could help your vision condition. Please see the VISION CONDITIONS for more information about vision and recommendations about which product to use.

 

CATARACTS

Developing cataracts is not a sign of aging but a message that your visual system and your body are out of balance...

 

MACULAR DEGENERATION

Macular Degeneration is widely recognized as one of the more nutritionally responsive conditions...

 

PRESBYOPIA

Presbyopia is the gradual loss of your eyes' ability to focus on nearby objects. It's a natural part of aging...

   

ASTIGMATISM & MORE

Here you will find all of the products that we offer for nearsightedness, astigmatism and more...

 

see more clearly, love more deeply

Valentine’s Day has come to be primarily associated with chocolates, flowers, teddy bears – all very sweet and fun – but very superficial expressions of love.

But this holiday can remind us to bring our awareness to something really important – how we are expressing love to ourselves and to others and in the world at large.

Long ago the eyes were called the windows to the soul.

Our eyes are sensitive, emotional receptors.

When you really want to get to know somebody you don’t look up their nose, you don’t look in their ears, you look in their eyes.

The eyes are an energy pathway out of the body. A window into someone’s inner being. A way for us to connect.

Yet we can go through an entire day and go to the store, go to work and go to a million different places, but maybe never, or maybe only once or twice, actually really look into another person’s eyes.

Why is this? Have our lives, like this holiday become more and more superficial? Are we afraid to see? Are we afraid others will see us?

As children we were naturally curious and we felt little shame.

Kids tend to start off very open, usually very loving, and caring. Most of us also started out with clear eyesight.

But along the way we develop patterns that keep us from seeing, and as a result keep us from connecting.

If a child sees something unfamiliar or alarming, say for example a man in a wheelchair, the little kid’s initial, immediate, unfiltered response is to be curious, “What is that? Why is that person in the chair?” The child might even want to go up and touch the chair or something like that. And what is often the parent’s first response? “Don’t look at him”.

In that pure child’s way there is a relationship between what we see, what we feel and what we do, but when we are in our process of socialization, we are taught to separate that out. We are taught to not look at certain things, we are taught to not look at people in a certain way, we are taught to be separate and, in the process of being taught to not see, we are taught to not feel, and to not act.

There is a connection between eyesight and personality, between eyesight and our relationship to ourselves, to others, to the world.

There is something we call a “myopic personality”, or “nearsighted personality”, which we will talk more about in another post. Certain traits of this personality that are exhibited by people who are nearsighted, are a contraction, a withdrawal from the outer world, a flight response without actually fleeing.

If you are nearsighted, or even if you are not, try examining whether there are ways in which you have constricted your world.

Do you really see the people you encounter as you go through life? Do you allow them to see you?

Tests have been done to show that if a person or an animal’s visual landscape is reduced for a period of time, for example marines who have spent time in submarines, they become more nearsighted. But the reverse is also true. When we retract into ourselves, bring our awareness in closer, we can create the conditions for ourself that lead to nearsightedness. This often happens on an unconscious level, so it is worth bringing attention to. 

What are you unwilling to see? Are you shutting down parts of your awareness or parts of your consciousness as an avoidance tactic?

And are there ways to face those areas of your life and engage?

Is it possible that we are not seeing or connecting because we know if we did we would feel something and inevitably be compelled to act on what we feel?

It is only when we have lost touch with our own ability to see and to connect that we lose touch with the power of the fullness of our feelings and our drive to action.

Or are we too afraid to look into someone else’s eyes because we don’t want them to see us? When we are truly seen we are exposed.

Yet showing your authentic self can lead to the most rewarding connections and deepest love. Can you bring more compassion to yourself?

An intimate relationship can be difficult if we have been patterned to disconnect, to shut down our feelings, and to hide.

Can you allow yourself to be seen?

Take on the challenge this month to make your expression of love a deeper one. Either reach out to someone you have isolated yourself from, or express yourself to someone you spend every day with in a more authentic way. Maybe there is someone at the checkout at the grocery store or at the gas station you frequent that you have encountered before but never taken the time to look in there eyes and see them. You could stretch by expressing an act of self-love and forgiving yourself or offering yourself some words of kindness . Maybe chose a certain limitation you have, a short-coming, a part of yourself that you have judged or not fully accepted. And spend some time with this part of yourself. Tell it you acknowledge it as part of you. These simple gestures can be incredibly powerful if done with pure intention.

At the Cambridge Institute for Better Vision our goal is to teach people how to release the negative patterns on the muscular level in the eyes, but also how to release the negative patterns on the emotional level, how nutrition affects the way you see, how your mind, your attitudes, your perception, your imagination, and your inner healing can be used to help you change and improve your eyesight.

Healing our vision and clearing the negative patterns that keep us from seeing brings forward the opportunity for us to feel compassion, to heal our hearts, and to love more deeply. It also allows us the opportunity to act out of whatever those open eyes and open heart call us to act upon.

EyeMax Plus

Contains a unique and balanced blend of 33 essential nutrients that are known to promote both eye and body health.

Learn More

The Program for Better Vision

Step-by-step, holistic approach that you can practice in just 20 minutes a day.

Learn More

product buttons

PBV  CLICK HERE to begin helping nearsightedness, astigmatism, eye imbalances, eye strain.

RWG  CLICK HERE to begin helping presbyopia (the need for reading glasses).

EMP  CLICK HERE to see the essential Vision Formula we recommend.

Contact

Better Vision
65 Eastern Ave #B1-E
Essex, MA 01929

Toll Free: 1-800-372-3937
International: 1-978-801-1850
Fax: 1-978-768-3938
Hours: 10am - 4pm EST
info@bettervision.com

Get started on your path to better vision today

with the Program for Better Vision.

SOME COMMON VISION CONDITIONS THAT WE CAN HELP WITH*:

There may be more than one product that could help your vision condition. Please see the VISION CONDITIONS for more information about vision and recommendations about which product to use.

 

CATARACTS

Developing cataracts is not a sign of aging but a message that your visual system and your body are out of balance...

 

MACULAR DEGENERATION

Macular Degeneration is widely recognized as one of the more nutritionally responsive conditions...

 

PRESBYOPIA

Presbyopia is the gradual loss of your eyes' ability to focus on nearby objects. It's a natural part of aging...

   

ASTIGMATISM & MORE

Here you will find all of the products that we offer for nearsightedness, astigmatism and more...